Sweatshops and child labor

Sweatshops There is no single definition of what a sweatshop is. The US Department of Labor defines a sweatshop as a factory that violates two or more labor laws, such as those pertaining to wages and benefits, child labor or working hours. In general, a sweatshop can be described as a workplace where workers are subject to extreme exploitation, including the absence of a living wage or benefits, poor working conditions, and arbitrary discipline, such as verbal and physical abuse.

Sweatshops and child labor

TheWorldCounts, 07 July, Your dress is pretty… who made it? In recent news, a Welsh woman was looking at the label of a new dress for washing instructions.

But when you hear the message directly from the worker, a cry for help, it takes on a different meaning. Just who are making the clothes that we wear?

Are they as happy to make it as we are to wear it? Some were horrified and was worried that the workers might be punished. Child labour in sweatshops exist to this day and there are millions of workers who are grossly underpaid, working in less than acceptable conditions — and majority of them are children.

A sweatshop is defined by the Department of Labor as a factory which violates 2 or more labor laws. It has 3 characteristics — low pay, long brutal hours and unhealthy working conditions. An adult who has no other option but to work in a sweatshop is in a pitiful situation indeed, but more so when a child is sold or forced to work in such an environment.

Although the number of children in child labor has declined in recent years, 1 in 6 children between the ages of 5 to 14 years old are still in some form of child labor in developing countries.

Sweatshops like employing children since they seldom complain about the working conditions and they are given a smaller wage.

Rugs and Carpet manufacturers prefer children because of their small and fast hands. Child slavery is rampant in the Cocoa industry. Exploiting Poverty The continuous presence of sweatshops, especially in the garment industry is due to the lack of Corporate Social Responsibility on the part of global corporations.

The employment opportunity may seem like a good thing for the people, until they find that their wages are not even enough to pay for their daily expenses. Are sweatshops a necessary evil since people need jobs to feed their family? A job should be able to improve the lives of the workers and lift them out of poverty.

Products made in Sweatshops The biggest industries which utilize sweatshops for manufacturing are:The National Labor Committee brought sweatshops into the mainstream media in the s when it exposed the use of sweatshop and child labor to sew clothing for Kathie Lee Gifford's Wal-Mart label. United Students Against Sweatshops is .

Use this interactive quiz/printable worksheet assessment to check your knowledge of the past and current history of child labor and sweatshops. Children pay high price for cheap labour. This is the kind of work that the Convention on the Rights of the Child seeks to end.

US Department of Labor, By the sweat and toil of children: the use of child labour in American imports, report to Congress, 15 July A "sweatshop" is defined by the US Department of Labor as a factory that violates 2 or more labor laws.

Sweatshops often have poor working conditions, unfair wages, unreasonable hours, child labor, and a lack of benefits for workers. › Sweatshops and child labor essay. Sweatshops and child labor essay. Sweatshops and child labor essay. 5 stars based on 53 reviews ashio-midori.com Essay.

Sweatshops and child labor

Utilitarianism ethics essay paper essayas woldemariam kasahun. Essaye clothing stockists of blue. Mexican word essay. Set up. A "sweatshop" is defined by the US Department of Labor as a factory that violates 2 or more labor laws. Sweatshops often have poor working conditions, unfair wages, unreasonable hours, child labor, and a lack of benefits for workers.

Sweatshop - Wikipedia